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Category: Manufacturing, Calibration, Accuracy, Oil and Gas, Contamination, Transformers

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Vacuum knowledge straight from the source. Browse DigiVac's products and educational materials for vacuum experts by vacuum experts.

Solvent Recovery and Distillation

The term ‘solvent’ refers to several chemical substances which are used to dissolve or dilute other substances or materials. They are usually organic liquids.  Solvents usually have a low boiling point and evaporate easily or can be removed by distillation, thereby leaving the dissolved substance behind. Solvents should therefore not react chemically with the dissolved compounds—they must be inert.

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Fraction Finder for Ethanol Extraction Sight Glass on Ethanol Extractor

What Extraction technique is right for you?

The cannabis market uses three main extraction techniques: CO2, liquefied hydrocarbons, and ethanol extraction.  Below explains  each method and how the extraction takes place and who and why some would use one specific method over another.

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Don’t Get Fooled By These Common Vacuum Processing Myths

Rotary evaporators are advanced scientific instruments that are commonly used in chemical laboratories, processing laboratories and in research to facilitate fractionation. This separation process allows the solvents to be removed gently through evaporation and the precise control of the temperature.

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What is Solvent Recovery?

Solvent recovery is the process of extracting target products from waste or by-product solvents generated during the manufacturing process. These chemicals can then be repurposed, reducing the need to produce or purchase new solvents, while eliminating a large amount of waste and removing potentially hazardous substances from the primary processed material

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Avoid False Readings When Vacuum Sensors Fail

Avoid False Readings When Vacuum Sensors Fail Ever feel like this guy? Damage to sensors and units alike is an inevitable facet of field work that can put undue stress on even a well-prepared crew, especially when time is of the essence. Vacuum sensors are calibrated in air. However, sensor contamination can occur easily in real-world applications leading to failure or false readings. Having multiple back-up vacuum sensors on hand that have already been factory calibrated to your specific vacuum gauge can save time, stress, and avoid the risk of inaccurate readings. Read on! Some sources of sensor contamination: Vacuum process byproducts  Improper

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