Category: Medical/Pharma, Researcher topics, Vacuum Regulation, Vacuum system setup, vacuum system needs, Rough Vacuum, medical, laboratory, vacuum drying, freeze drying, vacuum oven

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Improving Resolution of Electron Microscopy with FYRA

A customer approached Digivac to assist with vacuum control in an electron microscope. A vacuum within the microscope deeper than 20 Pascals (approx. 150 millitorr) causes visible degradation in the final image. The customer needed the ability to measure inside the chamber and precisely control the vacuum between 20 and 30 pascals while the electron microscope captures the image. 

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End of Vacuum Drying Detection with FYRA

Trying to get to the primary drying end point can be time consuming and energy intensive whether you are going about it with a freeze dryer or a vacuum oven. However, there is a way to optimize this process so you know when your process is complete and all solvents like water are evaporated and product is dry. Wouldn’t it be time saving if you took the guess work out of your vacuum drying process?

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Automate & Optimize your Vacuum Oven Drying with SNAP

Onboard Temperature and Vacuum Control for Most Vacuum Ovens: Vacuum ovens come with excellent temperature control mechanisms, but many are paired with manual isolation valves for vacuum. What this means is that, you can set your temperature digitally, but you have to turn valves to adjust the pressure in the chamber.

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Pharmaceutical | Freeze-drying and Vacuum Ovens

Pharmaceutical Freeze Drying and Vacuum Drying for Research and Manufacturing in the .01 Torr to 400 Torr Range Vacuum Pressure is used in Pharmaceutical Manufacturing to:  Help create bulk and active ingredients for FDA approved drug products Increase the shelf-life of a drug product Sterilize medical devices  Lyophilization, also known as freeze drying, is a process used for preserving biological material by removing the water from the sample, which involves first freezing the sample and then drying it, under a vacuum, at very low temperatures. The low pressure environment helps minimize oxidation during drying. Lyophilized samples may be stored much longer than untreated samples. The resulting precipitate is a

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